Posts Tagged “Panama”

Panama Gets the Panama Canal

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FACT OF THE DAY: It was 19 years ago today that Panama FINALLY gained control of the Panama Canal. December 31, 1999 (1 day before Y2K) was the day the United States handed over control of the canal to Panama for the first time. This was done in accordance with the Torrijos-Carter Treaties.

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General Noriega Hates Heavy Metal

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FACT OF THE DAY: Let’s take a trip back in time to 1989. Panamanian dictator General Manuel Noriega was in charge and he was avoiding capture by the United States military. US military had in trapped in the Vatican embassy in Panama City. How did they get him to come out? By blasting heavy metal music. After some AC/DC, The Clash, and Van Halen to name a few, Noriega surrendered.

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Where Does the Sun RISE Over the Pacific?

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Panama

FACT OF THE DAY:  The sun rises over the Atlantic Ocean and the sun sets over the Pacific Ocean, right?  That is correct. Well, that is correct everywhere except for ONE place… Panama!

This Central American country is the ONLY place in the world where one can see the sun rise over the Pacific and set over the Atlantic.

Pretty cool, isn’t it?  [We thought so.]

 

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What Killed Bananas During the 1950’s?

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Funny Bananas

FACT OF THE DAY:  During the 1950’s, the banana industry died thanks to the Panama Disease. The disease was a fungal infection that killed the roots of the banana plants. The damage was so severe that it killed the biggest cultivar (or species) of banana called the Gros Michel.

Gros Michel was the world’s biggest exporter of bananas until 1965, when it officially went under. The disease started in Panama but expanded to most of the world’s plantations. Soon enough, there was no choice left but to burn down all plantations and start over.

Welcome in the Cavendish brand/breed of bananas. The Cavendish was cultivated in a way that it would be immune to the Panama Disease. The new bananas had a different taste and slightly different look than its predecessor, but they quickly became accepted worldwide.

 

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